Sun King Brewing Osiris Pale Ale

  • (Please visit The Brew Bros to see my review over there, as I am now writing for them!)

    First and foremost, I want to announce that I am officially a member of The Brew Bros in a writing/contributing capacity.  I will be posting my reviews and articles there (as well as here for the time being, until I can garner some more personal experiences with craft beer), but I would greatly appreciate it if you would click through the link I provide at the top of each review to visit it on The Brew Bros site.  This is a pretty cool honor for me in that I’m a woman and it’s a male dominated site, and that I’m considered knowledgeable enough (or maybe I’m just entertaining and can tell a good story?) to contribute to such a great up-and-coming place for craft beer articles.  I do have to figure out my official title over there, as “Brew Bro” just doesn’t cut it for a non-male such as myself, so if you have any suggestions, let me know, as I am at a complete loss.  Eventually I’m hoping to begin homebrewing on my own by the end of the year or early next year, so as I start that, I will most likely blog about that here while I continue posting reviews over there.  We’ll see how everything works out before I make any definitive statements, but that’s what’s going on in a nutshell!  And now for the review…

    *****

    Finally completing my first ever trade through the mail with a very generous guy from Indiana, I received a beer from a brewery I hadn’t heard of – perhaps ashamedly – before I opened the box.  Osiris Pale Ale brewed by Sun King Brewing Company based out of Indianapolis, Indiana.  Granted, I don’t know much about Indiana other than that there are a lot of fields and driving through it can be ridiculously boring.  Fortunately, thanks to the craft beer world and social media, I am now learning more about the state than ever before, regardless of whether or not most of that information is about where to find great beer.  Unfortunately, most of it, including Sun King, can’t be found in Arizona, so I’ll have to rely on trades for the time being.

    Pouring it into a standard tumbler, it radiates a bright golden amber with glimmers of straw yellow highlights.  It appears crystal clear with constant trails of carbonation that calmly float from the bottom of the glass, building a fluffy white 3-finger head of large bubbles that melt into a creamy froth, leaving minimal fragile lacing along the sides of the glass.

    The aroma holds quite a bit of grainy honey wheat bread and soft caramel in the backbone.  Elsewhere, there are plenty of fresh floral hops and tropical citrus hops, including grapefruit pith and lemon peel, with a small possibility of some papaya, that overwhelms my nose initially.  Faint piney hops hide in the background, while something spicy and resembling graham cracker brings up the rear.  Overall, it is very reminiscent of an IPA.

    Starting off with a slow sip, I’m met with caramel, wheat bread drizzled with honey and sprinkled with brown sugar, and grainy, toasted malts.  All of the early flavors prepared my tongue for the dry, lightly spicy hops, comprised of zesty grapefruit and lemon pulp as well as some pine notes.  The generous amount of hops in this American Pale Ale awakened my tastebuds before smoothing it all out with a final blanket of sweet pale malts.

    The Osiris Pale Ale falls into the medium-bodied range once it warms up a bit, though fresh from the refrigerator, it starts more with a lighter mouthfeel.  Regardless of body, though, it remained crisp and smooth the whole way through, especially with the lively carbonation, and finished dry and slightly bitter – which is the least I would expect coming from such an aggressively hopped beer.

    I definitely enjoyed this beer and wish I had easier access to Sun King Brewery as a whole.  If they can make an APA this rich and delicious, I can only imagine what the rest of their beers have in store for my senses.  I also really liked that it’s canned and appreciated locally – as well as far away thanks to trades – in the tall pint-size can.  It’s a very easy beer to drink, with little to no alcohol flavor at all, thanks to all of the lovely hops that take over many of the different aspects of the brew.  If you live in Indiana, lucky you!  If you don’t, find someone who does and ask them to send you some Sun King, it’ll be worth it.  Cheers!

1 comment
  • Lucklys
    Lucklys I've known about 3 Floyds for a while, but, like Sun King, can't get it in Arizona without trading, so I've been trying to keep it out of my mind. I actually have a Gumballhead sitting in my fridge for a future review thanks to a trade. Yes, still looki...  more
    July 28, 2011